Science is that boy I liked in fourth grade: it pretty much hates me, but I chase it anyway.

saulofortz:

Larry Phillips originally shared:



 
The BrachistochroneThis animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: The Brachistochrone Challenge:If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics,Calculus of Variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in Quantum Mechanics and other fields.

saulofortz:

 
The Brachistochrone
This animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: The Brachistochrone Challenge:

If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?

Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.

Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics,Calculus of Variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in Quantum Mechanics and other fields.

(via awkward-aeries)

twisteddoodles:

The truth about Eureka.

twisteddoodles:

The truth about Eureka.

(via lovethroughthelenses)

asapscience:

Brings a tear to our eye. 

asapscience:

Brings a tear to our eye. 

(Source: thedailysnooze, via nichevonasveteluchshenetu)

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

(via thawren)

jtotheizzoe:

Let This Awesome Science Infect Your Mind

Ed Yong is one of the finest science writers in the world. His National Geographic blog is chock full of the weird, wild, and WTF-inducing stories that make our living world so darn interesting. So I was overjoyed when I heard he would be speaking at this year’s TED.

He didn’t disappoint. In his talk above, he unlocks the under-appreciated and often cringe-worthy world of mind-controlling parasites. They get no respect, I tell ya, no respect at all. Yet they are cornerstones of countless ecosystems, determining food availability and managing population sizes like armies of freaky fauna, each deployed in a Trojan Horse of evolution’s design. Every parasite’s life is a story, by definition, an elaborate chain that extends from host to host, and I think they’ve found their minstrel in Ed. I mean that as a compliment, of course.

Listen to him weave a tapestry of tapeworms, explain what makes flamingos munch on zombie shrimp, show you how a cricket is like a TARDIS, how a wasp turns a cockroach into a cocker spaniel, and how a brain-controlling protozoan reminds him of an Elizabeth Gilbert novel. My favorite part of this? The idea that ideas themselves may be parasites.

I haven’t loved a TED talk this much in a long time. Or maybe that’s just the parasite talking. 

My favorite TED talk so far!

(via nichevonasveteluchshenetu)